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Tumors of the Mediastinum

Mediastinal tumors are growths that form in the area that separates the lungs. This area contains the heart, large blood vessels, windpipe (trachea), thymus gland, and connective tissues.

The mediastinum is the part of the chest that lies between the sternum and the spinal column, and between the lungs. It contains the esophagus, trachea, heart, and other important structures. The mediastinum is divided into three sections:

  • Anterior (front)
  • Middle
  • Posterior (back)

Mediastinal tumors are rare.

The most common location for tumors in the mediastinum depends on the age of the patient. In children, tumors are more common in the posterior mediastinum. These tumors often begin in the nerves and are non-cancerous (benign).

Most mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum and are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas or thymomas. These tumors are most common in people ages 30 – 50.

Symptoms 

Half of mediastinal tumors cause no symptoms and are found on a chest x-ray performed for another reason.

Symptoms that do occur are due to pressure on (compression of) local structures and may include:

  • Chest pain
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Coughing up blood (hemoptysis)
  • Fever
  • Hoarseness
  • Night sweats
  • Shortness of breath

Exams and tests

A medical history and physical examination may show:

  • Fever
  • High-pitched breathing sound (stridor)
  • Swollen or tender lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy)
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Wheezing

Further testing may include

  • Chest x-ray
  • CT-guided needle biopsy
  • CT scan of the chest
  • Mediastinoscopy with biopsy
  • MRI of the chest

Treatment

Treatment for mediastinal tumors depends on the type of tumor.

For thymic cancers, surgery is the treatment of choice. It may be followed by radiation or chemotherapy, depending on the stage of the tumor and the success of the surgery.

For lymphomas, chemotherapy followed by radiation is the treatment of choice.

For neurogenic tumors of the posterior mediastinum, surgery is the treatment of choice.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome depends on the type of tumor. Different tumors respond differently to chemotherapy and radiation.

Source: Adapted from content provided by the National Institutes of Health (http://www.nih.gov). Always consult a physician about specific medical problems.